The Use of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII): Parental and professional perceptions of self-care mastery and autonomy in children and adolescents

Jill Weissberg-Benchell*, Shirley S. Goodman, Jeanne Antisdel Lomaglio, Kathy Zebracki

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To describe parent-perceived mastery of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII) specific skills and level of autonomy for these tasks among youth with type 1 diabetes. Methods: One hundred and sixty-three parents of youth using CSII and 142 diabetes clinicians participated. Parents reported their child's mastery and autonomy of CSII-specific skills. Clinicians indicated the age at which 50% of their patients mastered these skills. Results: Parents report CSII skill mastery between 10.9 and 12.8 years. Very few achieved skill mastery on all CSII-related tasks. Parent- and clinician-expectations for age of skill acquisition were consistent with one another. Parents shared CSII task responsibility with their children even after their children have attained skill mastery. Conclusion: The recent emphasis on maintaining parental involvement in diabetes care seems to have been translated into clinical practice. Parents remain involved in their child's CSII care even after they believe their child has mastered these skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1196-1202
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume32
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Keywords

  • CSII
  • Self-care autonomy
  • Type 1 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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