The Use of newborn screening pulse oximetry to detect cyanotic congenital heart disease: A survey of current practice at army, navy, and air force hospitals

Ashley E. Smith, Timothy G. Vedder, Patrick K. Hunter, Michael R. Carr, Matthew A. Studer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine the prevalence of newborn screening pulse oximetry (+POx) among military hospitals, including barriers to instituting protocols. Methods: An internet-based questionnaire was forwarded to the senior pediatricians at military hospitals worldwide supporting newborn deliveries. Results: Forty seven of 53 hospitals (88%) supporting deliveries responded to the survey. Thirty percent of hospitals utilize a +POx protocol. Eight centers cited no problems with implementation. All hospitals screened at ≥24 hours of life. The site of recording, positive values, and follow-up for positive screens varied. Cardiology consult and echocardiogram were not mandated. Most hospitals (34/47) are unable to obtain a pediatric cardiology consult without transfer. Few hospitals (9/47) utilize a telemedicine system. Seventy-fi ve percent (24/32) of hospitals not utilizing a protocol are interested in instituting one. Conclusion: Though slightly less than one-third of military hospitals use a +POx, there is a greater interest in its use. More reliable consultative services and a robust telemedicine system may aid its implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-346
Number of pages4
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume176
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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