The use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to classify the factors influencing mobility reported by persons with an amputation: An international study

Seema Radhakrishnan, Friedbert Kohler*, Christoph Gutenbrunner, Arun Jayaraman, Jianin Li, Karin Pieber, Carolina Schiappacasse

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Amputation of lower limb results in limitations in mobility which are amenable to multiple rehabilitation interventions. The challenges faced by the persons with lower limb amputation vary internationally. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health provides a common language to describe the function of persons with lower limb amputation across various countries. Objectives: This article reports the concepts in mobility important to persons with lower limb amputation across six countries using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Study design: Qualitative study using focus groups and individual interviews. Methods: Focus groups and individual interviews of persons with lower limb amputation were organised across six countries to identify the issues faced by patients with an amputation during and after their amputation, subsequent rehabilitation and on an ongoing basis in their daily life. Meaningful concepts were extracted from the responses and linked to suitable second-level and where applicable third-level International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categorical frequencies were analysed to represent the prevalence and spread of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories by location. Results: A total of 133 patients were interviewed. A large percentage (93%) of the identified concepts could be matched to International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories for quantitative analysis. Conclusion: The important concepts in mobility were similar across different countries. The comprehensiveness of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a classification system for human function and its universality across the globe is demonstrated by the large proportion of the concepts contained in the interviews from across the study centres that could be matched to International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories. Clinical relevance: The activity and participation restrictions faced by a person with lower limb amputation vary internationally and are amenable to multiple rehabilitation interventions. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health may provide a common language to report and quantify the various concepts important to the patient in their rehabilitation journey.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-419
Number of pages8
JournalProsthetics and Orthotics International
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

Keywords

  • Developing countries
  • Disability and Health
  • International Classification of Functioning
  • mobility
  • outcome measurement
  • patient perspective
  • prosthetics
  • prosthetics and orthotics in developing countries
  • rehabilitation
  • rehabilitation of amputees

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)
  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to classify the factors influencing mobility reported by persons with an amputation: An international study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this