The use of visual information in shared visual spaces: Informing the development of virtual co-presence

Robert E. Kraut*, Darren Gergle, Susan R. Fussell

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

129 Scopus citations

Abstract

A shared visual workspace is one where multiple people can see the same objects at roughly the same time. We present findings from an experiment investigating the effects of shared visual space on a collaborative puzzle task. We show that having the shared visual space helps collaborators understand the current state of their task and enables them to communicate and ground their conversations efficiently. These processes are associated with faster and better task performance. Delaying the visual update in the space reduces benefits and degrades performance. The shared visual space is more useful when tasks are visually complex or when actors have no simple vocabulary for describing their world. We find evidence for the ways in which participants adapt their discourse processes to their level of shared visual information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work
Pages31-40
Number of pages10
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
EventThe eight Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW 2002) - New Orleans, LA, United States
Duration: Nov 16 2002Nov 20 2002

Other

OtherThe eight Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW 2002)
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans, LA
Period11/16/0211/20/02

Keywords

  • Computer-supported collaborative work
  • Conversational analysis
  • Empirical studies
  • Language and communication
  • Shared visual space

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hardware and Architecture

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