The utility of neuropsychological consultation in identifying medical inpatients with suspected cognitive impairment at risk for greater hospital utilization

Erica Sieg*, Quan Mai, Caterina Mosti, Michael Brook

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This was a retrospective study designed to examine the relationship between inpatient neuropsychological status and future utilization costs. Methods: We completed a retrospective chart review of 280 patients admitted to a large academic medical center who were referred for bedside neuropsychological evaluation. Patients were grouped based on neuropsychological recommendation regarding level of supportive needs post-discharge (low, moderate, high). Level of support was used as a gross surrogate indicator of cognitive status in this heterogeneous sample. We also included patients who refused assessment. Outcome variables included time to readmission, number of emergency department visits, inpatient admissions, length of hospitalization, and total costs of hospitalizations, 30 days and 1 year following discharge. Results: Multivariate analysis indicated patients who refused assessment had higher inpatient service utilization (number of ED visits, number of admissions, and total cost of hospitalization) compared to those with moderate needs. Also, high needs patients had higher total cost of hospitalization at 1 year, and those with low needs used the ED more, compared to those with moderate needs. Conclusions: Our findings replicate prior studies linking refusal of neuropsychological evaluation to higher service utilization costs, and suggest a nonlinear relationship between cognitive impairment severity and future costs for medical inpatients (different groups incur different types of costs). Results preliminarily highlight the potential utility of inpatient neuropsychological assessment in identifying patients at risk for greater hospital utilization, which may allow for the development of appropriate interventions for these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-89
Number of pages15
JournalClinical Neuropsychologist
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2019

Fingerprint

Inpatients
Referral and Consultation
Costs and Cost Analysis
Hospitalization
Cognitive Dysfunction
Costs
Cognitive Impairment
Hospital Emergency Service
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • Health care utilization
  • clinical neuropsychology
  • hospital utilization
  • neuropsychological assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: This was a retrospective study designed to examine the relationship between inpatient neuropsychological status and future utilization costs. Methods: We completed a retrospective chart review of 280 patients admitted to a large academic medical center who were referred for bedside neuropsychological evaluation. Patients were grouped based on neuropsychological recommendation regarding level of supportive needs post-discharge (low, moderate, high). Level of support was used as a gross surrogate indicator of cognitive status in this heterogeneous sample. We also included patients who refused assessment. Outcome variables included time to readmission, number of emergency department visits, inpatient admissions, length of hospitalization, and total costs of hospitalizations, 30 days and 1 year following discharge. Results: Multivariate analysis indicated patients who refused assessment had higher inpatient service utilization (number of ED visits, number of admissions, and total cost of hospitalization) compared to those with moderate needs. Also, high needs patients had higher total cost of hospitalization at 1 year, and those with low needs used the ED more, compared to those with moderate needs. Conclusions: Our findings replicate prior studies linking refusal of neuropsychological evaluation to higher service utilization costs, and suggest a nonlinear relationship between cognitive impairment severity and future costs for medical inpatients (different groups incur different types of costs). Results preliminarily highlight the potential utility of inpatient neuropsychological assessment in identifying patients at risk for greater hospital utilization, which may allow for the development of appropriate interventions for these patients.",
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AB - Objective: This was a retrospective study designed to examine the relationship between inpatient neuropsychological status and future utilization costs. Methods: We completed a retrospective chart review of 280 patients admitted to a large academic medical center who were referred for bedside neuropsychological evaluation. Patients were grouped based on neuropsychological recommendation regarding level of supportive needs post-discharge (low, moderate, high). Level of support was used as a gross surrogate indicator of cognitive status in this heterogeneous sample. We also included patients who refused assessment. Outcome variables included time to readmission, number of emergency department visits, inpatient admissions, length of hospitalization, and total costs of hospitalizations, 30 days and 1 year following discharge. Results: Multivariate analysis indicated patients who refused assessment had higher inpatient service utilization (number of ED visits, number of admissions, and total cost of hospitalization) compared to those with moderate needs. Also, high needs patients had higher total cost of hospitalization at 1 year, and those with low needs used the ED more, compared to those with moderate needs. Conclusions: Our findings replicate prior studies linking refusal of neuropsychological evaluation to higher service utilization costs, and suggest a nonlinear relationship between cognitive impairment severity and future costs for medical inpatients (different groups incur different types of costs). Results preliminarily highlight the potential utility of inpatient neuropsychological assessment in identifying patients at risk for greater hospital utilization, which may allow for the development of appropriate interventions for these patients.

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