The validity of self-reported drug use in non-treatment seeking individuals with cocaine dependence: Correlation with biochemical assays

I. Elman, S. Krause, H. C. Breiter, R. L. Gollub, J. Heintges, W. A. Baumgartner, B. R. Rosen, D. R. Gastfriend

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Accurate estimate of drug exposure plays an important role in studies of the neurobiology of drug dependence. The validity of self-reported drug use by subjects participating in such studies has not been well established. This study examined the relationship between self-reported drug use and biological markers in 18 non-treatment-seeking cocaine-dependent individuals participating in research on the effects of cocaine on the brain. A significant relationship was found between self-reported frequency of cocaine use and hair cocaine concentration. Frequency of alcohol use correlated significantly with plasma carbohydrate-deficient transferrin and aspartate aminotransferase levels. These results suggest that self-reported substance use in non-treatment seeking research subjects is generally valid.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-221
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The validity of self-reported drug use in non-treatment seeking individuals with cocaine dependence: Correlation with biochemical assays'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this