The wildcat corpus of native-and foreign-accented english: Communicative efficiency across conversational dyads with varying language alignment profiles

Kristin J. van Engen, Melissa Baese-Berk, Rachel E. Baker, Arim Choi, Midam Kim, Ann R. Bradlow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

85 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper describes the development of the Wildcat Corpus of native- and foreign-accented English, a corpus containing scripted and spontaneous speech recordings from 24 native speakers of American English and 52 non-native speakers of English. The core element of this corpus is a set of spontaneous speech recordings, for which a new method of eliciting dialogue-based, laboratory-quality speech recordings was developed (the Diapix task). Dialogues between two native speakers of English, between two non-native speakers of English (with either shared or different L1s), and between one native and one non-native speaker of English are included and analyzed in terms of general measures of communicative efficiency. The overall finding was that pairs of native talkers were most efficient, followed by mixed native/non-native pairs and non-native pairs with shared L1. Non-native pairs with different L1s were least efficient. These results support the hypothesis that successful speech communication depends both on the alignment of talkers to the target language and on the alignment of talkers to one another in terms of native language background.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)510-540
Number of pages31
JournalLanguage and Speech
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Keywords

  • Diapix task
  • foreign-accented speech
  • spontaneous speech
  • task-oriented dialogue
  • type-token ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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