Therapeutic effects of robotic-assisted locomotor training on neuromuscular properties

M. M. Mirbagheri*, C. Tsao, E. Pelosin, William Z Rymer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

We studied the effects of Robotic-Assisted Locomotor (LOKOMAT) Training on the neuromuscular mechanical properties and voluntary movement of the spastic ankle in persons with incomplete Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). System identification techniques were used to characterize the effects of Lokomat training on the mechanical abnormalities of the ankle joint. We also determined the effects of this physical training on repeated voluntary movements of the ankle from full plantarflexion to dorsiflexion at maximum speed, quantified by measuring their kinematics parameters. We found that reflex stiffness, abnormally increased in SCI, was significantly reduced following LOKOMAT training. Active range of motion, peak-velocity and peak-acceleration of voluntary movement increased as a result of LOKOMAT training. These findings demonstrate that LOKOMAT training has a potential to modified abnormal reflex function and improve impaired voluntary movement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2005 IEEE 9th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2005
Pages561-564
Number of pages4
Volume2005
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event2005 IEEE 9th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2005 - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Jun 28 2005Jul 1 2005

Other

Other2005 IEEE 9th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2005
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period6/28/057/1/05

Keywords

  • Ankle
  • Impairment
  • Kinematics
  • Locomotion
  • Reflex
  • Robotic
  • Spasticity
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Stiffness
  • Voluntary movement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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