‘There’s nothing you can do … it’s like that in Chinatown’: Chinese immigrant women’s perceptions of experiences in Chicago Chinatown healthcare settings

Melissa A. Simon*, Laura S. Tom, Shaneah Taylor, Ivy Leung, Dan Vicencio

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Chinese American women living in linguistically isolated communities are among the least likely to utilize healthcare services. Qualitative research methods can help identify health system vulnerability points to improve local healthcare delivery for this population. Design: We conducted 6 focus groups among 56 Chinese-speaking adult women in Chicago’s Chinatown between July and August 2014 to explore their perceptions of experiences receiving medical care and interacting with healthcare providers in Chinatown healthcare settings. Results: Health system/clinic infrastructure and patient–provider communications were perceived barriers to care at Chinatown healthcare settings. Chinese participants reported long wait times, difficulty scheduling appointments, and poor front desk customer service. Communication difficulties at Chinatown healthcare settings involved language barriers with non-Chinese-speaking providers, but consideration for healthcare providers, provider demeanor, and reliance on provider recommendation also hindered patient–provider communications. Conclusions: Findings improve understanding of barriers to care experienced by Chinese immigrant women in one urban Chinatown community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEthnicity and Health
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Chinese
  • health services
  • healthcare
  • immigrants
  • patient–provider communications
  • qualitative research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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