Thermoregulatory and metabolic defects in Huntington's disease transgenic mice implicate PGC-1α in Huntington's disease neurodegeneration

Patrick Weydt, Victor V. Pineda, Anne E. Torrence, Randell T. Libby, Terrence F. Satterfield, Eduardo R Lazarowski, Merle L. Gilbert, Gregory J. Morton, Theodor K. Bammler, Andrew D. Strand, Libin Cui, Richard P. Beyer, Courtney N. Easley, Annette C. Smith, Dimitri Krainc, Serge Luquet, Ian R Sweet, Michael W. Schwartz, Albert R. La Spada*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

455 Scopus citations

Abstract

Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal, dominantly inherited disorder caused by polyglutamine repeat expansion in the huntingtin (htt) gene. Here, we observe that HD mice develop hypothermia associated with impaired activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT). Although sympathetic stimulation of PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) was intact in BAT of HD mice, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP-1) induction was blunted. In cultured cells, expression of mutant htt suppressed UCP-1 promoter activity; this was reversed by PGC-1α expression. HD mice showed reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure, with dysfunctional BAT mitochondria. PGC-1α is a known regulator of mitochondrial function; here, we document reduced expression of PGC-1α target genes in HD patient and mouse striatum. Mitochondria of HD mouse brain show reduced oxygen consumption rates. Finally, HD striatal neurons expressing exogenous PGC-1α were resistant to 3-nitropropionic acid treatment. Altered PGC-1α function may thus link transcription dysregulation and mitochondrial dysfunction in HD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-362
Number of pages14
JournalCell Metabolism
Volume4
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

Keywords

  • HUMDISEASE
  • MOLNEURO

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Thermoregulatory and metabolic defects in Huntington's disease transgenic mice implicate PGC-1α in Huntington's disease neurodegeneration'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this