Thrombospondin-1 proteomimetic polymers exhibit anti-angiogenic activity in a neovascular age-related macular degeneration mouse model

Wonmin Choi, Ashley K. Nensel, Steven Droho, Mara A. Fattah, Soumitra Mokashi Punekar, David I. Swygart, Spencer T. Burton, Greg W. Schwartz, Jeremy A. Lavine*, Nathan C. Gianneschi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. Current therapy includes monthly intraocular injections of anti-VEGF antibodies, which are ineffective in up to one third of patients. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) inhibits angiogenesis via CD36 binding, and its down-regulated expression is negatively associated with the onset of nAMD. Here, we describe TSP1 mimetic protein-like polymers (TSP1 PLPs). TSP1 PLPs bind CD36 with high affinity, resist degradation, show prolonged intraocular half-lives (13.1 hours), have no toxicity at relevant concentrations in vivo (40 μM), and are more efficacious in ex vivo choroidal sprouting assays compared to the peptide sequence and Eylea (aflibercept), the current standard of care anti-VEGF treatment. Furthermore, PLPs exhibit superior in vivo efficacy in a mouse model for nAMD compared to control PLPs consisting of scrambled peptide sequences, using fluorescein angiography and immunofluorescence. Since TSP-1 inhibits angiogenesis by VEGF-dependent and independent mechanisms, TSP1 PLPs are a potential therapeutic for patients with anti-VEGF treatment–resistant nAMD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbereadi8534
JournalScience Advances
Volume9
Issue number41
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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