Thyrotropin releasing hormone uptake into serum and cerebrospinal fluid following intravenous or subcutaneous administration

B. R. Brooks, N. Kalin, D. A. Beaulieu, C. Barksdale, R. L. Sufit, D. G. Dills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intravenous thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) was administered to 6 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients at a dose rate of 10 mg/kg. Blood samples were obtained prior to and at 10, 20, 40, 60, and 120 min during the TRH infusions. Lumbar punctures were performed at 90 min following the start of infusion. The mean serum TRH concentration rose from 0.03 ± 0.02 (SD) to 17 ± 2 ng/ml by 60 min and remained constant to 120 min. The mean CSF TRH concentration rose 10-fold from 0.02 ± 0.01 to 0.2 ± 0.02 ng/ml at 90 min and increased further to 0.5 ± 0.2 ng/ml at 120 min. Subcutaneous TRH was administered to 4 ALS patients at 2.5 mg/kg and to 5 ALS patietns at 5.0 mg/kg. The mean serum TRH concentration increased to 1.4 ± 0.6 ng/ml (2.5 mg/kg) and 3.2 ± 1.1 ng/ml (5.0 mg/kg) by 60 min. The mean CSF TRH concentration at 60 min increased to 0.3 ± 0.08 ng/ml following 2.5 mg/kg TRH and 0.8 ± 0.04 ng/ml following 5.0 mg/kg TRH. TRH entry into the CSF is comparable following subcutaneous or intravenous administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-238
Number of pages3
JournalNeurological Research
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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