Tightening research-practice connections: Applying insights and strategies during design charrettes

Susan McKenney, Kimberley Gomez, Brian Reiser

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Design charrettes feature hands-on activities for capturing, analyzing and developing the knowledge, values, and vision of its participants. In this workshop, using a design charrette approach, participants will (a) consider how their research informs formal and informal practice, (b) learn about a variety of outlets for bringing research to practice audiences, and (c) consider who might benefit from learning about the research. Participants will discuss different modes of research-practice interaction, and their implications for the production and use of new knowledge. Individuals will analyze their current approaches to knowledge dissemination for use and participants will share existing strategies to stimulate fruitful and mutually informing research-practice connections. Participants will designs their own research-practice connections, both through individual projects and through the ISLS community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences
Subtitle of host publicationThe Future of Learning, ICLS 2012 - Proceedings
Pages590-591
Number of pages2
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Event10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Future of Learning, ICLS 2012 - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: Jul 2 2012Jul 6 2012

Publication series

Name10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Future of Learning, ICLS 2012 - Proceedings
Volume2

Other

Other10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Future of Learning, ICLS 2012
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period7/2/127/6/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Education

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