Time course and extent of functional recovery during the first postoperative year after minimally invasive total hip arthroplasty with two different surgical approaches-a randomized controlled trial

Kharma C. Foucher, Markus A. Wimmer*, Kirsten C. Moisio, Madelaine Hildebrand, Martin C. Berli, Matthew R. Walker, Richard A. Berger, Jorge O. Galante

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

While others have reported short-term comparisons between various minimally invasive surgical (MIS) approaches to total hip arthroplasty (THA) and their conventional analogues, longer-term data is lacking, as is information indicating whether MIS approaches to THA provide a biomechanically complete recovery. Furthermore, different MIS approaches have not been compared. Our approaches of interest were a one-incision modified Watson-Jones, and a two-incision approach. Hypotheses: (1) There are significant differences in gait recovery patterns between the two surgical groups and (2) THA subjects have significant differences in function one year after surgery compared to control subjects. To test these hypotheses, THA candidates (n=26) were randomized to receive one of these MIS approaches and evaluated preoperatively, and postoperatively at 3 weeks, and at 3, 6 and 12 months. Evaluations included three-dimensional gait analysis and 24-hour step-counts. The same data were obtained from 25 control subjects. Recovery time-course was assessed using repeated measures ANOVA. T-tests were used to compare controls with the pooled group of THA subjects. We found no differences between the two THA surgical groups regarding the time-course of recovery (p>0.591). Although recovery was statistically complete by 3 months postoperatively for all variables, there were significant differences from controls at 12 months. Most notably, the external hip adduction moment, which reflects hip abductor function, was more than one standard deviation below normal (p<0.001). THA subject inactivity could not explain the gait differences, since one year after surgery daily step counts were not significantly different from controls (p=0.346). More work is necessary to determine ways to improve biomechanical outcomes for today's patients with high expectations for function and implant longevity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-378
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 3 2011

Keywords

  • Biomechanics
  • Functional recovery
  • Gait
  • Surgical approach
  • Total hip arthroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Rehabilitation

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