Time course of alterations in adult spinal motoneuron properties in the sod1(G93a) mouse model of als

Seoan Huh, Charles J. Heckman, Marin Manuel*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease, motoneuron electrical properties are already altered during embryonic development. Motoneurons must therefore exhibit a re-markable capacity for homeostatic regulation to maintain a normal motor output for most of the life of the patient. In the present article, we demonstrate how maintaining homeostasis could come at a very high cost. We studied the excitability of spinal motoneurons from young adult SOD1(G93A) mice to end-stage. Initially, homeostasis is highly successful in maintaining their overall excitability. This initial success, however, is achieved by pushing some cells far above the normal range of passive and active conductances. As the disease progresses, both passive and active conductances shrink below normal values in the surviving cells. This shrinkage may thus promote survival, implying the previously large values contribute to degeneration. These results support the hypothesis that motoneuronal homeostasis may be “hypervigilant” in ALS and a source of accumulating stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberENEURO.0378-20.2021
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournaleNeuro
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2021

Keywords

  • ALS
  • Electrophysiology
  • Homeostasis
  • In vivo recording
  • Motor neuron
  • Spinal cord

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Time course of alterations in adult spinal motoneuron properties in the sod1(G93a) mouse model of als'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this