Tissue engineered neural constructs designed for intracerebral gelation

M. C. Tate*, M. C. LaPlaca

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in death or severe neurological disability in 175,000 individuals each year in the U.S.. TBI treatment presents a significant clinical challenge because of the poor regenerative capabilities of the brain, resulting in permanent tissue loss. A tissue engineered construct consisting of cells embedded within an extracellular matrix scaffold has the potential to rescue damaged tissue and promote functional recovery. In this in vitro study, we investigated MatrigelTM and methylcellulose (MC) as potential construct materials for incorporation of neural cells. These materials form gels at physiologic temperatures yet exist as a solution at lower temperatures. This reverse gelation makes them particularly attractive for minimally invasive grafting in the brain. The material/cell constructs could be injected as a solution into lesioned areas and/or deafferented regions, where they would subsequently form a semi-solid hydrogel in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
PublisherIEEE
Number of pages1
Volume1
ISBN (Print)0780356756
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999
EventProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS) - Atlanta, GA, USA
Duration: Oct 13 1999Oct 16 1999

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1999 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (1st Joint BMES / EMBS)
CityAtlanta, GA, USA
Period10/13/9910/16/99

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

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