To Avoid or Not to Avoid: When Emotions Overflow

Esther Liu*, Michael E. Roloff

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study focuses on how postepisodic conflict avoidance is related to the emotional and behavioral reactions to a partner's destructive conflict behavior. The first hypothesis predicted that a partner's destructive behavior is positively related to postepisodic conflict avoidance when an individual becomes emotionally flooded and withdraws during an argument. Conversely, a partner's destructive behavior was expected to be negatively related to postepisodic conflict avoidance when an individual becomes emotionally flooded and reciprocates the destructive behavior during an argument. A path analysis of the accounts of 182 undergraduate participants about a recent conflict episode supported the second hypothesis but not the first. However, results indicate other positive paths between a partner's destructive behavior and postepisodic conflict avoidance. Limitations and future research directions are discussed. This study extends the anger avoidance model and also advances understanding of destructive communication processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)332-339
Number of pages8
JournalCommunication Research Reports
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2 2015

Keywords

  • Conflict Avoidance
  • Demand/Withdraw
  • Emotion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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