'To never shed blood': Yacouba Sylla, Félix Houphouët-Boigny and Islamic modernization in Côte d'Ivoire

Sean Hanretta*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

After an ill-fated religious revival, the Sufi teacher Yacouba Sylla and his followers became wealthy and politically influential in post-Second World War Côte d'Ivoire. They argued for an understanding of democratization and development that defined both ideas in terms of their community's own mystical experiences and world-historical significance, rather than in terms of modernity. As a way of making sense of their own past and defending their place in an increasingly tense political environment, these efforts achieved their most explicit articulation in a powerful story about Yacouba Sylla's refusal of a gift from Ivoirian President Félix Houphouët-Boigny.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-304
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of African History
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 9 2008

Keywords

  • African modernities
  • Côte d'Ivoire
  • Decolonization
  • Development
  • Islam
  • Political culture
  • Religion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History

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