Together Eating & Activity Matters (TEAM): results of a pilot randomized-clinical trial of a spousal support weight loss intervention for Black men

C. L. Alick*, C. Samuel-Hodge, D. Ward, A. Ammerman, C. Rini, D. F. Tate

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, participation, preliminary efficacy and retention in a couples-based weight loss intervention among Black men. Design, setting, participants: Two-arm pilot randomized clinical trial in an academic clinical setting. Forty self-identified Black men and their female cohabitating partners (n = 80) aged 18 to 65 years with body mass index from 25 to 45 kg/m2 were randomized using computer generated tables to allocate treatments. Intervention: Participants were randomized to a standard behavioural weight loss (Standard) programme or the Standard programme plus partner involvement (Enhanced). Both interventions focused on calorie reduction, physical activity and self-monitoring to facilitate weight loss. Enhanced included couples skills training and couple's communication components. Main outcome and measures: Changes in weight from baseline to 3 months among men. Partner weight loss (secondary). Results: Forty Black couples (men mean [SD] age, 47.4[11] years; body mass index, 35.0[6.1]), were recruited. Retention was 100% of the men and 98% of female partners. Attendance at group sessions was 63–73%. Between groups, mean (SD) weight changes among men were −3.4[.04] and −4.7[5.9] kg (p = 0.57) and among women −0.23[4.46] and −2.47[3.62] kg (p = 0.09), in the standard and enhanced groups. Conclusions: Weight losses from an intervention enhanced by partner involvement and an intervention with no partner involvement were not different. Treatment choice can be based on preference rather than outcome as both treatments are effective in producing clinically significant percent weight loss. Trial registration Clinical Trials NCT02458053.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-75
Number of pages14
JournalObesity Science and Practice
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Male
  • Social support
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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