Tolerance to noninherited maternal antigens, reproductive microchimerism and regulatory T cell memory: 60 years after ‘Evidence for actively acquired tolerance to Rh antigens’

Jeremy M. Kinder, Tony T. Jiang, James M. Ertelt, Lijun Xin, Beverly S. Strong, Aimen F. Shaaban, Sing Sing Way*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Compulsory exposure to genetically foreign maternal tissue imprints in offspring sustained tolerance to noninherited maternal antigens (NIMA). Immunological tolerance to NIMA was first described by Dr. Ray D. Owen for women genetically negative for erythrocyte rhesus (Rh) antigen with reduced sensitization from developmental Rh exposure by their mothers. Extending this analysis to HLA haplotypes has uncovered the exciting potential for therapeutically exploiting NIMA-specific tolerance naturally engrained in mammalian reproduction for improved clinical outcomes after allogeneic transplantation. Herein, we summarize emerging scientific concepts stemming from tolerance to NIMA that includes postnatal maintenance of microchimeric maternal origin cells in offspring, expanded accumulation of immune suppressive regulatory T cells with NIMA-specificity, along with teleological benefits and immunological consequences of NIMA-specific tolerance conserved across mammalian species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-20
Number of pages13
JournalChimerism
Volume6
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

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