Topical vascular endothelial growth factor reverses delayed wound healing secondary to angiogenesis inhibitor administration

Joseph Michaels V, Michael Dobryansky, Robert D. Galiano, Kirit A. Bhatt, Russell Ashinoff, Daniel J. Ceradini, Geoffrey C. Gurtner*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

The prevention of new blood vessel growth is an increasingly attractive strategy to limit tumor growth. However, it remains unclear whether anti-angiogenesis approaches will impair wound healing, a process thought to be angiogenesis dependent. Results of previous studies differ as to whether angiogenesis inhibitors delay wound healing. We evaluated whether endostatin at tumor-inhibiting doses delayed excisional wound closure. C57/BL6J mice were treated with endostatin or phosphate-buffered solution 3 days prior to the creation of two full-thickness wounds on the dorsum. Endostatin was administered daily until wound closure was complete. A third group received endostatin, but also had daily topical vascular endothelial growth factor applied locally to the wound. Wound area was measured daily and the wounds were analyzed for granulation tissue formation, epithelial gap, and wound vascularity. Endostatin-treated mice showed a significant delay in wound healing. Granulation tissue formation and wound vascularity were significantly decreased, but reepithelialization was not effected. Topical vascular endothelial growth factor application to wounds in endostatin-treated mice resulted in increased granulation tissue formation, increased wound vascularity, and wound closure approaching that of control mice. This study shows that the angiogenesis inhibitor endostatin delays wound healing and that topical vascular endothelial growth factor is effective in counteracting this effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)506-512
Number of pages7
JournalWound Repair and Regeneration
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology

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