Toward the development of a neural interface for lower limb prosthesis control

L. J. Hargrove, H. Huang, A. E. Schultz, B. A. Lock, R. Lipschutz, T. A. Kuiken

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lower limb amputees form a large portion of the amputee population; however, current lower limb prostheses do not meet the needs of patients with high-level amputations who need to perform multi-joint coordinated movements. A critical missing element is an intuitive neural interface from which user intent can be determined. Surface EMG has been used as control source for upper limb prostheses for many years; for lower limb activities, however, the EMG is non-stationary and a new control strategy is required. This paper describes the work completed to date in developing a novel lower limb neural interface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Subtitle of host publicationEngineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages2111-2114
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781424432967
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Event31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Sep 2 2009Sep 6 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009

Other

Other31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period9/2/099/6/09

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

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