Towards a molecular epidemiology of alcohol dependence: Analysing the interplay of genetic and environmental risk factors

A. C. Heath*, J. B. Whitfield, P. A F Madden, K. K. Bucholz, S. H. Dinwiddie, W. S. Slutske, L. J. Bierut, D. B. Statham, N. G. Martin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Progress in identifying genetic factors protective against alcohol dependence (AlcD) requires a paradigm shift in psychiatric epidemiology. Aims: To integrate analysis of research into the genetics of alcoholism. Method: Data from prospective questionnaire and interview surveys of the Australian twin panel, and from a subsample who underwent alcohol challenge, were analysed Results: In men, effects of alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2*1/*2 genotype or high alcohol sensitivity (risk-decreasing), and of history of childhood conduct disorder, or having monozygotic co-twin or twin sister with AlcD (risk-increasing) were significant and comparable in magnitude. Religious affiliation (Anglican versus other) was associated with the ADH2 genotype, but did not explain the associations with AlcD symptoms. No protective effect of the ADH2*1/*2 genotype was observed in women. Conclusions: The early onset and strong familial aggregation of AlcD, and opportunity for within-family tests of genetic association to avoid confounding effects, make epidemiological family studies of adolescents and young adults and their families a priority. Declaration of interest: This research was supported by grants from the US National Institutes of Health, the US Alcohol Beverage Medical Research Foundation and the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)s33-s40
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume178
Issue numberSUPPL. 40
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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