Trace eyeblink conditioning in abstinent alcoholic individuals: Effects of complex task demands and prior conditioning

Regina E. McGlinchey*, Stephen M. Capozzi, Catherine B. Fortier, John F. Disterhoft

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chronic misuse of alcohol affects an integrated neural circuit supporting the formation of associative memories acquired during eyeblink classical conditioning (R. McGlinchey-Berroth et al., 1995). The authors of this study investigated single-cue trace conditioning in amnesic and nonamnesic abstinent alcoholic individuals who either were or were not trained in a single-cue delay conditioning task. Overall, untrained alcoholic participants were severely impaired in acquisition, and alcoholic participants previously trained in single-cue delay conditioning performed similarly to untrained control participants. Individual performance in acquisition varied significantly within task but was relatively stable between the trace and delay tasks; there were nonamnesic and amnesic alcoholic participants who acquired responses at a normal rate in both delay and trace conditioning. The similarity of performances in delay and trace conditioning suggests a common source of impairment across both tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-170
Number of pages12
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Keywords

  • Alcoholism
  • Associative learning
  • Memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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