Tracking the dissemination of a culturally targeted brochure to promote awareness of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer among Black women

Courtney Lynam Scherr, Linda Bomboka, Alison Nelson, Tuya Pal, Susan Thomas Vadaparampil*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective Black women have a higher rate of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) mutations, compared with other populations, that increases their risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, Black women are less likely to know about HBOC and genetic testing. Based on a request from a community advisory panel of breast cancer survivors, community leaders and healthcare providers in the Black community, our team developed a culturally targeted educational brochure to promote awareness of HBOC among Black women. Methods To reach the target population we utilized a passive dissemination strategy. Using Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) as a framework, we traced dissemination of the brochure over a five year period using self-addressed postcards contained inside the brochure that included several open-ended questions about the utility of the brochure, and a field for written comments. Closed-ended responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis was conducted on the open-ended responses. Results DOI captured the proliferation of the brochure among Black women across the US. Practice implications The use of passive dissemination strategies among pre-existing social networks proved to be a useful and sustainable method for increasing knowledge of HBOC among Black women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)805-811
Number of pages7
JournalPatient education and counseling
Volume100
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2017

Keywords

  • Black women
  • Diffusion of innovation
  • Dissemination
  • Genetics
  • Health disparities
  • Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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