Transcriptional Memory: Staying in the Loop

Jason H Brickner*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Actively transcribed genes are organized into loops in which the 5′ and 3′ ends of the gene physically associate. Two new papers show that gene looping can persist after genes are repressed, promoting rapid reactivation of transcription, a phenomenon known as transcriptional memory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 12 2010

Fingerprint

Genes
Data storage equipment
genes
Transcription
transcription (genetics)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

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title = "Transcriptional Memory: Staying in the Loop",
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Transcriptional Memory : Staying in the Loop. / Brickner, Jason H.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 20, No. 1, 12.01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

TY - JOUR

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T2 - Staying in the Loop

AU - Brickner, Jason H

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