Transforming growth factor beta as a clinical biomarker for prostate cancer

Kent T. Perry, Catherine T. Anthony, Tom Case, Mitchell S. Steiner*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. Tumor biomarkers to detect prostate cancer earlier may reduce prostate cancer deaths. Transforming growth factor-beta1 and -beta2 (TGF-beta1 and -beta2) become overexpressed in prostate cancer and might be useful tumor markers of prostate cancer. Methods. Plasma and urinary TGF- beta1 and plasma TGF-beta2 levels were studied preoperatively in 74 consecutive patients who had prostate cancer and underwent radical prostatectomy and were compared with those of 29 similarly aged male control patients who had no clinical evidence of prostate cancer. Results. Plasma TGF-beta1 levels were similar in both prostate cancer and control groups and did not correlate with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), clinical and pathologic stages, or Gleason grade. Urinary TGF-beta 1 levels, however, increased 3.5-fold in patients with prostate cancer relative to controls and tended to be higher with advancing clinical and pathologic stages. Plasma TGF-beta2 levels, like plasma TGF-beta1 levels, were similar for both the study and control groups, but when stratified by pathologic stage or Gleason grade, patients with prostate cancer with pathologic Stage T2a and Gleason grade of 3 or less had significantly increased plasma TGF-beta2 levels as compared with either control patients or patients with prostate cancer with pathologic Stages T2b/T2c and T3/T4 or Gleason grade of 4 or more, suggesting that early prostate cancer may contribute to plasma TGF-beta2 levels. Conclusions. Unlike plasma TGF-beta1 levels, urinary TGF-beta1 and plasma TGF-beta2 levels were higher in patients with prostate cancer and may be useful biomarkers of prostate cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-155
Number of pages5
JournalUrology
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Transforming Growth Factor beta
Prostatic Neoplasms
Transforming Growth Factor beta1
Biomarkers
Transforming Growth Factor beta2
Tumor Biomarkers
Control Groups
Prostate-Specific Antigen
Prostatectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Perry, Kent T. ; Anthony, Catherine T. ; Case, Tom ; Steiner, Mitchell S. / Transforming growth factor beta as a clinical biomarker for prostate cancer. In: Urology. 1997 ; Vol. 49, No. 1. pp. 151-155.
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Transforming growth factor beta as a clinical biomarker for prostate cancer. / Perry, Kent T.; Anthony, Catherine T.; Case, Tom; Steiner, Mitchell S.

In: Urology, Vol. 49, No. 1, 01.01.1997, p. 151-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Case, Tom

AU - Steiner, Mitchell S.

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N2 - Objectives. Tumor biomarkers to detect prostate cancer earlier may reduce prostate cancer deaths. Transforming growth factor-beta1 and -beta2 (TGF-beta1 and -beta2) become overexpressed in prostate cancer and might be useful tumor markers of prostate cancer. Methods. Plasma and urinary TGF- beta1 and plasma TGF-beta2 levels were studied preoperatively in 74 consecutive patients who had prostate cancer and underwent radical prostatectomy and were compared with those of 29 similarly aged male control patients who had no clinical evidence of prostate cancer. Results. Plasma TGF-beta1 levels were similar in both prostate cancer and control groups and did not correlate with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), clinical and pathologic stages, or Gleason grade. Urinary TGF-beta 1 levels, however, increased 3.5-fold in patients with prostate cancer relative to controls and tended to be higher with advancing clinical and pathologic stages. Plasma TGF-beta2 levels, like plasma TGF-beta1 levels, were similar for both the study and control groups, but when stratified by pathologic stage or Gleason grade, patients with prostate cancer with pathologic Stage T2a and Gleason grade of 3 or less had significantly increased plasma TGF-beta2 levels as compared with either control patients or patients with prostate cancer with pathologic Stages T2b/T2c and T3/T4 or Gleason grade of 4 or more, suggesting that early prostate cancer may contribute to plasma TGF-beta2 levels. Conclusions. Unlike plasma TGF-beta1 levels, urinary TGF-beta1 and plasma TGF-beta2 levels were higher in patients with prostate cancer and may be useful biomarkers of prostate cancer.

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