Transient- and tone-evoked otoacoustic emissions in three species

J. H. Siegel*, K. Charaziak, M. A. Cheatham

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Otoacoustic emissions evoked by low-level pure tones (stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions or SFOAE) and brief tone pips (transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions or TEOAE) were compared within each of three species: human, chinchilla and mouse, using the same methods. In each species the spectrum of TEOAE and SFOAE showed similar fine structure in level and phase versus frequency with nearly identical slopes, indicating comparable group delays. Emission delays were longest in humans and shortest in mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWhat Fire is in Mine Ears
Subtitle of host publicationProgress in Auditory Biomechanics - Proceedings of the 11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop
Pages307-312
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 12 2011
Event11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop - What Fire is in Mine Ears: Progress in Auditory Biomechanics - Williamstown, MA, United States
Duration: Jul 16 2011Jul 22 2011

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume1403
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

Other11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop - What Fire is in Mine Ears: Progress in Auditory Biomechanics
CountryUnited States
CityWilliamstown, MA
Period7/16/117/22/11

Keywords

  • chinchilla
  • cochlear amplifier
  • human
  • mouse
  • stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions
  • transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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    Siegel, J. H., Charaziak, K., & Cheatham, M. A. (2011). Transient- and tone-evoked otoacoustic emissions in three species. In What Fire is in Mine Ears: Progress in Auditory Biomechanics - Proceedings of the 11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop (pp. 307-312). (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 1403). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3658103