Trends: Effects of the malpractice crisis on access to and incidence of high-risk procedures: Evidence from Florida - Will the recent upsurge in malpractice premiums drive obstetricians and neurosurgeons away from "crisis states"?

David Dranove*, Anne Gron

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is much debate on how recent increases in medical malpractice premiums affect patients' access to care. We examined activity levels of neurosurgeons and obstetricians, as well as the incidence of high-risk surgery and patients' travel times in Florida, where malpractice insurance premiums have soared since 2000. Compared with 1997-2000, we found that during 2000-2003, many neurosurgeons cut back their volume of brain surgeries and that craniotomy patients traveled longer for care without any significant change in the overall incidence of craniotomies. Women undergoing high-risk deliveries did not see increases in travel times.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)802-810
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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