Trends in breast conserving surgery among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, 1992-2000

Mita Sanghavi Goel*, Risa B. Burns, Russell S. Phillips, Roger B. Davis, Quyen Ngo-Metzger, Ellen P. McCarthy

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) has been the recommended treatment for early-stage breast cancer since 1990 yet many women still do not receive this procedure. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between birthplace and use of BCS in Asian-American and Pacific-Islander (AAPI) women, and to determine whether disparities between white and AAPI women persist over time, DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Women with newly diagnosed stage I or II breast cancer from 1992 to 2000 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. OUTCOME: Receipt of breast -conserving surgery for initial treatment of stage I or II breast cancer. MAIN RESULTS: Overall, AAPI women had lower rates of BCS than white women (47% vs 59%; P<.01). Foreign-born AAPI women had lower rates of BCS than U.S.-born AAPI and white women (43% vs 56% vs 59%; P<.01). After adjustment for age, marital status, tumor registry, year of diagnosis, stage at diagnosis, tumor size, histology, grade, and hormone receptor status, foreign-born AAPI women (adjusted OR [aOR], 0.49; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.76) and U.S.-born AAPI women (aOR, 0.77: 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.95) had lower odds of receiving BCS than white women. Use of BCS increased over time for each racial/ethnic group: however, foreign-born AAPI women had persistently lower rates of BCS than non-Hispanic white women. CONCLUSIONS: AAPI women, especially those who are foreign born, are less likely to receive BCS than non-Hispanic white women. Of particular concern, differences in BCS use among foreign-born and U.S.-born AAPI women and non-Hispanic white women have persisted over time. These differences may reflect inequities in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer for AAPI women, particularly those born abroad.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)604-611
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of general internal medicine
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005

Keywords

  • Breast neoplasms
  • Cancer treatment
  • Health disparities
  • Immigrant health
  • Race/ethnicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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