Trends in patient-perceived shared decision making among adults in the United States, 2002-2014

David Michael Levine*, Bruce E. Landon, Jeffrey A. Linder

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

To ascertain changes in shared decision making (SDM), we analyzed data from the nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. We aggregated responses to questions into a 7-point SDM composite score. Between 2002 and 2014, the mean SDM composite score increased from 4.4 to 5.0 (P <.01), indicating greater patient-perceived SDM. In multivariate modeling, SDM scores were higher for black vs white patients (+0.33 points) and those with a same-race/ ethnicity usual source of care (+0.24 points; both P <.05). Scores were lower for patients with poor-perceived health (−0.41 points), Asian vs white race/ethnicity (−0.28 points), and no insurance (−0.17 points; all P <.05). Improvement efforts should target Americans without a same-race/ethnicity usual source of care and with poor-perceived health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)552-556
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of family medicine
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Keywords

  • Clinical decision-making
  • Decision support techniques
  • Patient-centered care
  • Primary care
  • Shared decision making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

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