Trends in persistent seasonal-scale atmospheric circulation patterns responsible for seasonal precipitation totals and occurrences of precipitation extremes over Canada

Xuezhi Tan, Thian Yew Gan, Shu Chen, Daniel E. Horton, Xiaohong Chen, Bingjun Liu, Kairong Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Both large-scale atmospheric circulation and moisture content in the atmosphere govern regional precipitation. We partition recent changes in mean, heavy, and extreme precipitation for all seasons over Canada to changes in synoptic circulation patterns (dynamic changes) and in atmospheric moisture conditions (thermodynamic changes) using 500-hPa geopotential height and precipitation data over 1979-2014. Using the self-organizing map (SOM) cluster analysis, we identify statistically significant trends in occurrences of certain synoptic circulation patterns over the Canadian landmass, which have dynamically contributed to observed changes in precipitation totals and occurrence of heavy and extreme precipitation events over Canada. Occurrences of circulation patterns such as westerlies and ridges over western North America and the North Pacific have considerably affected regional precipitation over Canada. Precipitation intensity and occurrences of precipitation extremes associated with each SOM circulation pattern also showed statistically significant trends resulting from thermodynamic changes in the atmospheric moisture supply for precipitation events.A partition analysis based on the thermodynamic-dynamic partition method indicates that most (∼90%) changes in mean and extreme precipitation over Canada resulted from changes in precipitation regimes occurring under each synoptic circulation pattern (thermodynamic changes). Other regional precipitation changes resulted from changes in occurrences of synoptic circulation patterns (dynamic changes). Because of the high spatial variability of precipitation response to changes in thermodynamic and dynamic conditions, dynamic contributions could offset thermodynamic contributions to precipitation changes over some regions if thermodynamic and dynamic contributions are in opposition to each other (negative or positive), which would result in minimal changes in precipitation intensity and occurrences of heavy and extreme precipitation events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7105-7126
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Climate
Volume32
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

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