Trends in vascular risk factor treatment and control in US stroke survivors: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (1999-2010)

Nilay S. Shah, Mark D. Huffman*, Hongyan Ning, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background-Treatment and control of vascular risk factors reduce the likelihood of recurrent stroke. Present nationally representative data are sparse regarding secondary prevention treatment and control rates. Methods and Results-We evaluated sex- and race-stratified blood pressure, cholesterol, and hemoglobin A1c levels and treatment and control rates in 1154 self-reported stroke survivors from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 1999 to 2010. We used weighted linear regression to estimate time trends. Participants were 54% to 61% women, 70% to 76% white, and had a mean age of 63 to 66 years. For blood pressure, treatment rates remained unchanged in men, but in women, treatment rates increased from 41% in 1999 to 2000 to 65% in 2009 to 2010 (P=0.03), and control rates increased from 23% to 79% (P=0.03). Treatment rates remained unchanged in non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Mexican Americans, although control rates increased in non-Hispanic whites from 50% in 1999 to 2002 to 69% in 2007 to 2010 (P=0.04). For cholesterol, treatment rates increased from 30% to 40% in men (P=0.02) and from 28% to 36% (P<0.01) in women, but control rates increased only in men, from 62% to 87% (P<0.01). Cholesterol treatment rates increased only in non-Hispanic blacks, from 18% to 37% (P=0.02). By sex and race, there was no change in dysglycemia treatment and control. Conclusions-Despite improvements in blood pressure treatment and control and cholesterol treatment for women and cholesterol treatment and control for men, stroke secondary prevention through treatment and control of vascular risk factors remains suboptimal. Urgent action is needed to improve secondary prevention to reduce stroke morbidity and mortality in this high-risk group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)270-277
Number of pages8
JournalCirculation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

Keywords

  • Secondary prevention
  • Stroke
  • Treatment
  • Trends

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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