Tunable exciton binding energy in 2D hybrid layered perovskites through donor–acceptor interactions within the organic layer

James V. Passarelli, Catherine M. Mauck, Samuel W. Winslow, Collin F. Perkinson, Jacob C. Bard, Hiroaki Sai, Kristopher W. Williams, Ashwin Narayanan, Daniel J. Fairfield, Mark P. Hendricks, William A. Tisdale, Samuel I. Stupp*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The strength of electrostatic interactions within semiconductors strongly affects their performance in optoelectronic devices. An important target is the tuning of a material’s exciton binding energy—the energy binding an electron–hole pair through the electrostatic Coulomb force—independent of its electronic band gap. Here, we report on the doping of a family of two-dimensional hybrid perovskites, in which inorganic lead halide sheets alternate with naphthalene-based organic layers, with tetrachloro-1,2-benzoquinone (TCBQ). For four out of seven n = 1 perovskites, the incorporation of the electron-accepting TCBQ dopant into the organic sublattice containing the electron-donating naphthalene species enabled the tuning of the materials’ 1s exciton binding energy. The naphthalene–TCBQ electron donor–acceptor interactions increased the electrostatic screening of the exciton, in turn lowering its binding energy relative to the undoped perovskite—by almost 50% in one system. Structural and optical characterization showed that the inorganic lattice is not significantly perturbed even though the layer-to-layer spacing increases upon molecular dopant incorporation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)672-682
Number of pages11
JournalNature chemistry
Volume12
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

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