TV, PEER, AND PARENT MODELS FOR PRO‐ AND ANTISOCIAL CONFLICT BEHAVIORS

Michael Elwood Roloff*, BRADLEY S. GREENBERG

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study focused on the influence of mediated and unmediated models on the decision of adolescents to employ both pro‐ and antisocial modes of conflict resolution. Adolescents indicated how likely they would use four antisocial modes (verbal aggression, physical aggression, regression, and revenge) and one prosocial mode to resolve two conflicts. Their responses were correlated with four television viewing clusters (ABC crime/adventure, CBS crime/adventure, situation comedy, and nonpolice/adventure), the perceived likelihood that peers would employ the modes and the perceived likelihood that parents would employ the modes to discipline them. The television viewing clusters were inconsistent predictors of the adolescent use of the modes. The best predictor of adolescent use of the modes was perceived peer use followed by perceived parental use. Both mediated and unmediated influences produced significant multiple correlations and explained 34% to 48% of the variance in the adolescent use of the modes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)340-351
Number of pages12
JournalHuman Communication Research
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Anthropology
  • Linguistics and Language

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