Twenty-five-year changes in office and ambulatory blood pressure: Results from the coronary artery risk development in young adults (cardia) study

Joshua D. Bundy, Byron C. Jaeger, Mark D. Huffman, Sarah S. Knox, S. Justin Thomas, Daichi Shimbo, John N. Booth, Cora E. Lewis, Lloyd J. Edwards, Joseph E. Schwartz, Paul Muntner, Joshua D. Bundy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND Blood pressure (BP) measured in the office setting increases from early through later adulthood. However, it is unknown to what extent out-ofoffice BP derived via ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) increases over time, and which participant characteristics and risk factors might contribute to these increases. METHODS We assessed 25-year change in office- and ABPM-derived BP across sex, race, diabetes mellitus (DM), and body mass index (BMI) subgroups in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study using multivariable-adjusted linear mixed effects models. RESULTS We included 288 participants who underwent ABPM at the Year 5 Exam (mean [SD] age, 25.1 [3.7]; 45.8% men) and 455 participants who underwent ABPM at the Year 30 Exam (mean [SD] age, 49.5 [3.7]; 42.0% men). Office, daytime, and nighttime systolic BP (SBP) increased 12.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.6-17.9), 14.7 (95% CI, 9.7-19.8), and 16.6 (95% CI, 11.4-21.8) mm Hg, respectively, over 25 years. Office SBP increased 6.5 (95% CI, 2.3-10.6) mm Hg more among black compared with white participants. Daytime SBP increased 6.3 (95% CI, 0.2-12.4) mm Hg more among participants with a BMI ≥25 vs. <25 kg/m2. Nighttime SBP increased 4.7 (95% CI, 0.5-8.9) mm Hg more among black compared with white participants, and 17.3 (95% CI, 7.2-27.4) mm Hg more among participants with vs. without DM. CONCLUSIONS Office- and ABPM-derived BP increased more from early through middle adulthood among black adults and participants with DM and BMI ≥25 kg/m2

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)494-503
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Hypertension
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2021

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
  • Blood pressure
  • Epidemiology
  • Health status disparities
  • Hypertension
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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