Two viral kinases are required for sustained long distance axon transport of a neuroinvasive herpesvirus

Kelly E. Coller, Gregory A. Smith*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

Axonal transport is essential for the successful establishment of neuroinvasive herpesvirus infections in peripheral ganglia (retrograde transport) and the subsequent spread to exposed body surfaces following reactivation from latency (anterograde transport). We examined two components of pseudorabies virus (US3 and UL13), both of which are protein kinases, as potential regulators of axon transport. Following replication of mutant viruses lacking kinase activity, newly assembled capsids displayed an increase in retrograde motion that prevented efficient delivery of capsids to the distal axon. The aberrant increase in retrograde motion was accompanied by loss of a viral membrane marker from the transported capsids, indicating that the viral kinases allow for efficient anterograde transport by stabilizing membrane-capsid interactions during the long transit from the neuron cell body to the distal axon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1458-1470
Number of pages13
JournalTraffic
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Keywords

  • Axon
  • Fusion
  • Kinase
  • Membrane
  • Neuron
  • Transport
  • Viros

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Structural Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

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