Ultraviolet detectors for astrophysics: present and future

Melville P. Ulmer*, Manijeh Razeghi, Erwan Bigan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

Astronomical instruments for the study of UV astronomy have been developed for NASA missions such as the Hubble Space Telescope. The systems that are `blind to the visible' (`solar-blind') yet sensitive to the UV that have been flown in satellites have detective efficiencies of about 10 to 20%, although typically electron bombardment charge coupled devices are higher at 30 - 40% and ordinary CCDs achieve 1 - 5%. Therefore, there is a large payoff still to be gained by further improvements in the performance of solar blind UV detectors. We provide a brief review of some aspects of UV astronomy, UV detector development, and possible technologies for the future. We suggest that a particularly promising future technology is one based on the ability of investigators to produce high quality films made of wide bandgap III-V semiconductors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherSociety of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers
Pages210-217
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)0819417440, 9780819417442
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
EventOptoelectronic Integrated Circuit Materials, Physics, and Devices - San Jose, CA, USA
Duration: Feb 6 1995Feb 9 1995

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume2397
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherOptoelectronic Integrated Circuit Materials, Physics, and Devices
CitySan Jose, CA, USA
Period2/6/952/9/95

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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