Understanding predictors of change in a day treatment setting for non-suicidal self-injury

Noël C. Slesinger*, Nicole A. Hayes, Jason J. Washburn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To examine change in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) frequency, quality of life, and functional impairment from admission to discharge in patients enrolled in partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient programmes (PHP/IOP) designed to treat NSSI. Demographic, clinical, and treatment-related predictors of changes were also examined. Design: Data were collected as part of routine clinical assessment procedures at admission and discharge from patients enrolled in a PHP/IOP programme designed to treat NSSI. The clinical assessment included measures examining quality of life, functional impairment, and NSSI behaviour. Methods: Paired t-tests were used to examine change in NSSI frequency, quality of life, and functional impairment. Reliable clinical change analyses were used to identify clinically significant change in quality of life and functional impairment. Multilevel mixed-effects regression was used to examine predictors of change for quality of life and functional impairment. Negative binomial regression was used to examine predictors of change for NSSI frequency. Results: From admission to discharge, NSSI frequency significantly decreased and quality of life and functional impairment evidenced clinically significant change. Age, race/ethnicity, and insurance type predicted change in functional impairment, while gender predicted change in quality of life. Urge to self-injure predicted change in NSSI frequency. Borderline symptoms predicted change across all outcome variables. Conclusions: Patients who completed a day treatment programme for NSSI evidenced significant change in NSSI frequency, functional impairment, and quality of life at discharge; however, several demographic and clinical variables were associated with change. Practitioner points: Patients who engage in NSSI show significant change from admission to discharge in a day treatment programme dedicated to the treatment of NSSI. Quality of life and functional impairment are important outcome variables to consider and evaluate in higher levels of care. It is important to consider demographic and clinical variables when creating a treatment plan for NSSI. Although BPD symptoms may be important to consider in day treatment for NSSI, interpersonal dysfunction, depressive symptoms, and mood lability may also affect change in symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • non-suicidal self-injury
  • partial hospitalization programmes
  • programme evaluation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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