Unique presentations of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-induced papulopustular eruption related to bacterial superinfection

Lauren Elyse Wiznia, Jennifer Nam Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors have been reported to induce numerous cutaneous side effects, the most notable of which is a papulopustular eruption on the face, scalp, and central chest. The typical presentation consists of inflamed papules, often with pustules, favoring a seborrheic distribution. The pustules of the EGFR inhibitor-induced papulopustular eruption are commonly sterile but bacterial superinfection is not uncommon. We report two unique presentations of the papulopustular eruption that were found to be associated with Staphylococcus aureus superinfection. One patient presented with an abrupt onset of nearly confluent red plaques on the cheeks, forehead, chin, and neck, with innumerable studded pinpoint pustules. The other patient had a long-standing untreated papulopustular eruption on the scalp, which resulted in widespread erythema, large thick plaques of serous crust, pustular exudate, and associated alopecia. Both patients quickly resolved with non-tetracycline oral antibiotics combined with topical steroid treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalDermatology Online Journal
Volume19
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Unique presentations of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-induced papulopustular eruption related to bacterial superinfection'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this