Unreliable and anomalous: how the credibility of data affects belief revision

Jesse R. Sparks, David N. Rapp

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Individuals often revise their belief in conditional relations when faced with contradictory evidence. However, individuals' beliefs about the reliability of particular sources may influence their acceptance of such evidence. In three experiments, we examined effects of source credibility on belief revision. Participants were presented with a description of a mechanical system comprised of conditional relations with either uniform or randomly alternating components. Next, participants received a contradictory observation from a reliable, unreliable, or neutral source. When evidence came from an unreliable source, participants often failed to revise the conditional belief, regardless of the design of the system.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
EditorsL. Carlson, C. Hoelscher, T. F. Shipley
PublisherCognitive Science Society
StatePublished - 2011
EventProceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society - Austin, TX
Duration: Jul 1 2011 → …

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
Period7/1/11 → …

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  • Cite this

    Sparks, J. R., & Rapp, D. N. (2011). Unreliable and anomalous: how the credibility of data affects belief revision. In L. Carlson, C. Hoelscher, & T. F. Shipley (Eds.), Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society Cognitive Science Society.