Uptake of desflurane and isoflurane during closed-circuit anesthesia with spontaneous and controlled mechanical ventilation

Jan F.A. Hendrickx, Maurits Soetens, Agnes Van Der Donck, Herman Meeuwis, Francis Smolders, Andre M. De Wolf*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although theoretical models predict uptake of inhaled anesthetics during closed-circuit anesthesia (CCA), clinical data for most anesthetics are conflicting or nonexistent. In addition, the effects of patient characteristics and mode of ventilation on anesthetic uptake are unclear. Forty-one ASA physical status I or II adult patients undergoing a variety of 1-1.5 h surgical procedures were randomly allocated to receive CCA with desflurane or isoflurane with ventilation being either spontaneous or controlled. An end-expired anesthetic concentration of 1.3 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) was maintained by continuous injection of the liquid anesthetic into the circuit using a syringe pump. After an initial 4- min wash-in period, uptake during the first hour of CCA was nearly constant. Uptake was the same whether ventilation was spontaneous or controlled. Patient characteristics (age, height, weight, weight(3/4), and body surface area) were comparable between groups and did not correlate with uptake. The virtually constant uptake after wash-in of desflurane and isoflurane contrasts with the square root of time model of Lowe and Ernst. These findings may greatly simplify CCA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-418
Number of pages6
JournalAnesthesia and analgesia
Volume84
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 13 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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