Usage of the ACT3D robot in a brain machine interface for hand opening and closing in stroke survivors

Jun Yao*, Clay Sheaff, Julius P.A. Dewald

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

At six months after brain injury, about 65% of stroke survivors have been shown to be unable to incorporate the affected hand into activities of daily living (ADL). Using a reliable Brain-Machine-Interface (BMI) together with Neural Electronic Stimulation (NES) is a possible solution for the restoration of hand function in severely impaired hemiparetic stroke survivors. However, discoordination, i.e. the abnormal coupling between adjacent joints, causes an expected reduction in the performance of BMI algorithms. In this study, we test whether the active support of an ACT3D robot can increase the performance of two brain-machine-interface (BMI) algorithms in separating the subject's intention to open or close the impaired hand during reach. Improvement in recognition rate was obtained in 4 chronic hemiparetic stroke subjects when support from the robot was available. Further analysis on one subject suggests that such an improvement is related to quantitative changes in cortical activity. This result suggests that the ACT3D robot can be used to train severely impaired stroke subjects to use a BMI-controlled NES device.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07
Pages938-942
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Event2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07 - Noordwijk, Netherlands
Duration: Jun 12 2007Jun 15 2007

Publication series

Name2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07

Other

Other2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07
CountryNetherlands
CityNoordwijk
Period6/12/076/15/07

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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