Use of a purified reconstituted bilayer matrix in the management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers improves patient outcomes vs standard of care: Results of a prospective randomised controlled multi-centre clinical trial

David G. Armstrong, Dennis P. Orgill, Robert D. Galiano, Paul M. Glat, Jarrod P. Kaufman, Marissa J. Carter, Lawrence A. DiDomenico, Charles M. Zelen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Diabetic foot infections continue to be a major challenge for health care delivery systems. Following encouraging results from a pilot study using a novel purified reconstituted bilayer matrix (PRBM) to treat chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), we designed a prospective, multi-centre randomised trial comparing outcomes of PRBM at 12 weeks compared with a standard of care (SOC) using a collagen alginate dressing. The primary endpoint was percentage of wounds closed after 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included assessments of complications, healing time, quality of life, and cost to closure. Forty patients were included in an intent-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol (PP) analysis, with 39 completing the study protocol (n = 19 PRBM, n = 20 SOC). Wounds treated with PRBM were significantly more likely to close than wounds treated with SOC (ITT: 85% vs 30%, P =.0004, PP: 94% vs 30% P =.00008), healed significantly faster (mean 37 days vs 67 days for SOC, P =.002), and achieved a mean wound area reduction within 12 weeks of 96% vs 8.9% for SOC. No adverse events (AEs) directly related to PRBM treatment were reported. Mean PRBM cost of healing was $1731. Use of PRBM was safe and effective for treatment of chronic DFUs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Wound Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology

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