Use of different strategies to make one’s bisexual+ identity visible: Associations with dimensions of identity, minority stress, and health.

Brian Alan Feinstein*, Christina Dyar, J. Samuel Milstone, Jeremy Jabbour, Joanne Davila

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bisexual+ people (i.e., those who are attracted to more than one gender or regardless of gender) use a variety of strategies to make their identity visible to others, but little is known about the extent to which using different strategies is related to other dimensions of identity, minority stress, and health. To address this, we surveyed 715 bi+ people about their use of 5 different types of visibility strategies (direct communication, indirect communication, community engagement, gender-based visual displays, and public behavioral displays). Results indicated that people who used visibility strategies more often (aggregated across types) reported higher identity centrality and affirmation, and lower internalized bi-illegitimacy and internalized binegativity. However, they also reported more discrimination from heterosexual and gay/lesbian individuals and higher depression and anxiety. When we examined the unique associations between each of the 5 types of visibility strategies and our other variables, we found different patterns of associations for different strategies. For example, direct communication was uniquely associated with more discrimination from gay/lesbian individuals, while indirect communication, gender-based visual displays, and public behavioral displays were uniquely associated with more discrimination from heterosexual individuals. Only indirect communication was uniquely associated with higher depression and anxiety, while community engagement was uniquely associated with lower anxiety. Finally, public behavioral displays were uniquely associated with more alcohol use problems and a higher likelihood of cigarette use. These findings highlight the importance of examining the specific strategies that people use to make their bi+ identity visible in order to understand their experiences and health. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)184-191
Number of pages8
JournalStigma and Health
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Keywords

  • bisexual
  • mental health
  • minority stress
  • nonmonosexual
  • visibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Use of different strategies to make one’s bisexual+ identity visible: Associations with dimensions of identity, minority stress, and health.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this