Use of simulation-based education to improve resident learning and patient care in the medical intensive care unit: A randomized trial

Clara J. Schroedl*, Thomas C. Corbridge, Elaine R. Cohen, Sherene S. Fakhran, Daniel Schimmel, William C. McGaghie, Diane B. Wayne

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of simulation-based education on the knowledge and skills of internal medicine residents in the medical intensive care unit (MICU). Methods and Materials: From January 2009 to January 2010, 60 first-year residents at a tertiary care teaching hospital were randomized by month of rotation to an intervention group (simulator-trained, n = 26) and a control group (traditionally trained, n = 34). Simulator-trained residents completed 4 hours of simulation-based education before their medical intensive care unit (MICU) rotation. Topics included circulatory shock, respiratory failure, and mechanical ventilation. After their rotation, residents completed a standardized bedside skills assessment using a 14-item checklist regarding respiratory mechanics, ventilator settings, and circulatory parameters. Performance of simulator-trained and traditionally trained residents was compared using a 2-tailed independent-samples t test. Results: Simulator-trained residents scored significantly higher on the bedside skills assessment compared with traditionally trained residents (82.5% ± 10.6% vs 74.8% ± 14.1%, P = .027). Simulator-trained residents were highly satisfied with the simulation curriculum. Conclusions: Simulation-based education significantly improved resident knowledge and skill in the MICU. Knowledge acquired in the simulated environment was transferred to improved bedside skills caring for MICU patients. Simulation-based education is a valuable adjunct to standard clinical training for residents in the MICU.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219.e7-219.e13
JournalJournal of Critical Care
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Keywords

  • Clinical competence
  • Medical education
  • Medical intensive care unit
  • Quality of health care
  • Simulation training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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