Use of simulation-based education to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections

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Abstract

Background: Simulation-based education improves procedural competence in central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. The effect of simulation-based education in CVC insertion on the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if simulation-based training in CVC insertion reduces CRBSI. Methods: This was an observational education cohort study set in an adult intensive care unit (ICU) in an urban teaching hospital. Ninety-two internal medicine and emergency medicine residents completed a simulation-based mastery learning program in CVC insertion skills. Rates of CRBSI from CVCs inserted by residents in the ICU before and after the simulation-based educational intervention were compared over a 32-month period. Results: There were fewer CRBSIs after the simulator-trained residents entered the intervention ICU (0.50 infections per 1000 catheter-days) compared with both the same unit prior to the intervention (3.20 per 1000 catheter-days) (P=.001) and with another ICU in the same hospital throughout the study period (5.03 per 1000 catheter-days) (P=.001). Conclusions: An educational intervention in CVC insertion significantly improved patient outcomes. Simulation-based education is a valuable adjunct in residency education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1420-1423
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume169
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 10 2009

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Catheter-Related Infections
Central Venous Catheters
Intensive Care Units
Education
Catheters
Emergency Medicine
Urban Hospitals
Internship and Residency
Internal Medicine
Teaching Hospitals
Mental Competency
Cohort Studies
Learning
Incidence
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Use of simulation-based education to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections",
abstract = "Background: Simulation-based education improves procedural competence in central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. The effect of simulation-based education in CVC insertion on the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if simulation-based training in CVC insertion reduces CRBSI. Methods: This was an observational education cohort study set in an adult intensive care unit (ICU) in an urban teaching hospital. Ninety-two internal medicine and emergency medicine residents completed a simulation-based mastery learning program in CVC insertion skills. Rates of CRBSI from CVCs inserted by residents in the ICU before and after the simulation-based educational intervention were compared over a 32-month period. Results: There were fewer CRBSIs after the simulator-trained residents entered the intervention ICU (0.50 infections per 1000 catheter-days) compared with both the same unit prior to the intervention (3.20 per 1000 catheter-days) (P=.001) and with another ICU in the same hospital throughout the study period (5.03 per 1000 catheter-days) (P=.001). Conclusions: An educational intervention in CVC insertion significantly improved patient outcomes. Simulation-based education is a valuable adjunct in residency education.",
author = "Barsuk, {Jeffrey H.} and Cohen, {Elaine R.} and Joe Feinglass and McGaghie, {William C.} and Wayne, {Diane B.}",
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T1 - Use of simulation-based education to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections

AU - Barsuk, Jeffrey H.

AU - Cohen, Elaine R.

AU - Feinglass, Joe

AU - McGaghie, William C.

AU - Wayne, Diane B.

PY - 2009/8/10

Y1 - 2009/8/10

N2 - Background: Simulation-based education improves procedural competence in central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. The effect of simulation-based education in CVC insertion on the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if simulation-based training in CVC insertion reduces CRBSI. Methods: This was an observational education cohort study set in an adult intensive care unit (ICU) in an urban teaching hospital. Ninety-two internal medicine and emergency medicine residents completed a simulation-based mastery learning program in CVC insertion skills. Rates of CRBSI from CVCs inserted by residents in the ICU before and after the simulation-based educational intervention were compared over a 32-month period. Results: There were fewer CRBSIs after the simulator-trained residents entered the intervention ICU (0.50 infections per 1000 catheter-days) compared with both the same unit prior to the intervention (3.20 per 1000 catheter-days) (P=.001) and with another ICU in the same hospital throughout the study period (5.03 per 1000 catheter-days) (P=.001). Conclusions: An educational intervention in CVC insertion significantly improved patient outcomes. Simulation-based education is a valuable adjunct in residency education.

AB - Background: Simulation-based education improves procedural competence in central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. The effect of simulation-based education in CVC insertion on the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if simulation-based training in CVC insertion reduces CRBSI. Methods: This was an observational education cohort study set in an adult intensive care unit (ICU) in an urban teaching hospital. Ninety-two internal medicine and emergency medicine residents completed a simulation-based mastery learning program in CVC insertion skills. Rates of CRBSI from CVCs inserted by residents in the ICU before and after the simulation-based educational intervention were compared over a 32-month period. Results: There were fewer CRBSIs after the simulator-trained residents entered the intervention ICU (0.50 infections per 1000 catheter-days) compared with both the same unit prior to the intervention (3.20 per 1000 catheter-days) (P=.001) and with another ICU in the same hospital throughout the study period (5.03 per 1000 catheter-days) (P=.001). Conclusions: An educational intervention in CVC insertion significantly improved patient outcomes. Simulation-based education is a valuable adjunct in residency education.

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