Using a Vulnerability-Stress-Adaptation Framework to Predict Physical Aggression Trajectories in Newlywed Marriage

Amie Langer*, Erika Lawrence, Robin A. Barry

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors used a vulnerability-stress-adaptation framework to examine personality traits and chronic stress as predictors of the developmental course of physical aggression in the early years of marriage. Additionally, personality traits and physical aggression were examined as predictors of the developmental course of chronic stress. Data from 103 couples collected 4 times over the first 3 years of marriage were analyzed with an actor-partner interdependence model and structural equation modeling techniques. Personality traits of husbands predicted their own physical aggression and stress trajectories, as well as their wives' levels of stress and physical aggression. Personality traits of wives predicted their levels of stress and physical aggression and predicted changes in their physical aggression over time. Both husbands' and wives' changes in stress predicted changes in physical aggression over time. Implications for employment of a vulnerability-stress-adaptation model in the study of physical aggression and for improvement of the efficacy of therapies targeting physical aggression in intimate relationships are delineated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)756-768
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume76
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008

Keywords

  • APIM
  • VSA model
  • couples
  • marital
  • physical aggression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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