Using NPR to evaluate perceptual shape cues in dynamic environments

Holger Winnemöller*, David Feng, Bruce Gooch, Satoru Suzuki

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

We present a psychophysical experiment to determine the effectiveness of perceptual shape cues for rigidly moving objects in an interactive, highly dynamic task. We use standard non-photorealistic (NPR) techniques to carefully separate and study shape cues common to many rendering systems. Our experiment is simple to implement, engaging and intuitive for participants, and sensitive enough to detect significant differences between individual shape cues. We demonstrate our experimental design with a user study. In that study, participants are shown 16 moving objects, 4 of which are designated targets, rendered in different shape-from-X styles. Participants select targets projected onto a touch-sensitive table. We find that simple Lambertian shading offers the best shape cue in our user study, followed by contours and, lastly, texturing. Further results indicate that multiple shape cues should be used with care, as these may not behave additively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - NPAR 2007
Subtitle of host publication5th International Symposium on Non-Photorealistic Animation and Rendering
Pages85-92
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 17 2007
EventNPAR 2007: 5th International Symposium on Non-Photorealistic Animation and Rendering - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Aug 4 2007Aug 5 2007

Other

OtherNPAR 2007: 5th International Symposium on Non-Photorealistic Animation and Rendering
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period8/4/078/5/07

Keywords

  • Non-photorealistic rendering
  • Perception experiment
  • Shape-from-X
  • User-study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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