Using self-assembled monolayers to understand the interactions of man-made surfaces with proteins and cells

Milan Mrksich*, George M. Whitesides

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

775 Scopus citations

Abstract

Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed on the adsorption of long-chain alkanethiols to the surface of gold or alkylsilanes to hydroxylated surfaces are well-ordered organic surfaces that permit control over the properties of the interface at the molecular scale. The abililty to present molecules, peptides, and proteins at the interface make SAMs especially useful for fundamental studies of protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Microcontact printing is a simple technique that can pattern the formation of SAMs in the plane of the monolayer with dimensions on the micron scale. The convenience and broad application offered by SAMs and microcontact printing make this combination of techniques useful for studying a variety of fundamental phenomena in biointerfacial science.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-78
Number of pages24
JournalAnnual Review of Biophysics and Biomolecular Structure
Volume25
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Keywords

  • Biocompatibility
  • Biomaterials
  • Biosurfaces

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Structural Biology

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